Category Archives: Nebraska

Anthony Burries

On May 18, 2014 the body of Tina Holt was found in her apartment at approx . 8:30am.

Anthony Burries immediately became the only person OPD detectives were interested in. Anthony had been convicted approx 2 years prior and served his time for a domestic dispute with the victim. It was his only domestic and he plead guilty. Prosecutors used that to conviction to sway the jury’s emotions. The only witness they had was an ex girlfriend that changed her stories throughout the police interviews, but only after they informed her of his many girlfriends. She then said that on Friday May 16 at 3am she took him to Tina’s apt complex where he exited the car and was gone for 2-5 minutes. There was never evidence that she took him there. There was no DNA or blood evidence found in her car and when it was our attorneys turn to have the car processed they had sold the car from evidence holding.

Evidence of innocence:

1). The medical examiner stated in his testimony that the victim had been dead for 12-18 hours, a time of death late Saturday or early Sunday, NOT early on Friday as the State claimed.

2). Text messages received from victim after they claim she was already dead.

3). Eyewitnesses in victims apartment they claim stopping and speaking with her after police claim she was dead.

4). State witness has come forward since and given signed affidavit that prosecution told her to lie on the stand.

5). Anthony’s motion tracker on his phone shows he’s home when police claim he committed murder.

6). A boyfriend that lived under her claimed that he had just ate big meal with her Friday at 1:30 am. Medical examiner testified that there was only coffee colored fluid in stomach. Anthony was on video Friday May 16, in a bar till 3 am. Left extremely intoxicated according to bouncers. There was never a murder weapon found and they never tested the vaginal swabs or other items for DNA. His first lawyer did not build a case to prove his innocence because he said that dead people don’t talk to other people nor do they text.

Discussion | Proposal Post

Antoine Young

A gunman approaches a car idling in an Omaha fast-food drive-thru on a summer afternoon and fires the bullets that end Raymond Webb’s life. Two eyewitnesses take the stand and identify the shooter as a former prep basketball standout who had gone on to play at the University of Nebraska at Omaha in the early 1990s. A jury convicts Antoine D. Young and a judge sends him away for life.

But Young has always insisted he wasn’t the daylight executioner nine years ago. Now the 42-year-old inmate has persuaded a judge to hear out his theory about what really happened on Aug. 25, 2007, at the Taco Bell near 62nd Street and Ames Avenue. Young believes he can show that while an innocent man rots in prison, the true killer of Raymond Webb is about to walk free.

Read more here

Via Midwest Innocence Project

Proposal Post

Matthew Livers and Nicholas Sampson

Shortly after the 2006 shotgun slayings of Wayne and Sharmon Stock in their rural Cass County farmhouse, investigating officers zeroed in on Matthew Livers and his cousin Nicholas Sampson as prime suspects.

Livers, nephew of the murder victims, was 28 years old at the time of the murder and had no criminal record or exposure to the criminal justice system. Livers had been a special education student, and his IQ test score of 63 placed “his intellectual functioning below 99 percent of the population at large,” according to the suit.

Separated from his family and without a lawyer present, Livers was interrogated for 11 hours by investigators from the Cass County Sheriff’s Office and Nebraska State Patrol. Livers repeatedly denied any involvement in the crime. But after several hours of increasingly harsh and threatening questioning and being told his refusal to confess would result in the death penalty, Livers believed telling the officers what they wanted to hear would allow him to go home, and he finally implicated himself and Sampson in the murders. The following day, he recanted the confession.

Initially, no evidence linked either Livers or Sampson to the murders. Several weeks into the investigation, lawsuit Defendant David Kofoed, then head of the Douglas County (Neb.) Sheriff’s Crime Scene Investigation Unit claimed to have found victim Wayne Stock’s blood in a car, linked to Livers and Sampson, that investigators theorized was used in the murders.

At the murder scene, investigators found a marijuana pipe, a ring with an inscription and a flashlight that did not belong to the Stocks and likely had been left behind by the killers. After Livers’ confession, a Douglas County forensic investigator, who is not a defendant in the suit, was able to trace the ring to a Wisconsin man, who had left the ring in the glovebox of his truck. His truck had been stolen by Wisconsin residents Gregory Fester and Jessica Reid, who were in a Wisconsin jail in connection with that theft. They later confessed to killing the Stocks, and their confessions were supported by DNA evidence on the ring and pipe and by blood found on their clothing.

Officers in Nebraska attempted to cover their tracks by fabricating additional evidence against Livers and Sampson. They attempted to coerce and manipulate Reid, Fester and at least one other witness into implicating Livers and Sampson as co-conspirators in the murders. They continued to claim that the blood evidence supposedly found by Kofoed supported their case against Livers and Sampson.fter more than seven months in jail, the Cass County Attorney dismissed the charge and gave Livers his freedom. Dismissal of the case followed a State expert’s finding that psychological coercion was used to obtain the false confession and that Livers was especially vulnerable to heavy-handed tactics.

After the charges were dismissed against Livers and Sampson, David Kofoed was charged with evidence tampering in connection with the bogus finding of blood in the suspect vehicle. Kofoed was convicted and sentenced to prison. He was released after serving 18 months. Kofoed’s conviction was been affirmed by the Nebraska Supreme Court.

Livers  settled his civil suit against the Nebraska State Patrol investigators and Cass County, Nebraska, Sheriff’s Deputies for coercing him to confess falsely to the brutal murder of his aunt and uncle and fabricating evidence to make the false charges stick.  Under the settlement, Livers received a total of $1.65 million as compensation for his seven months of pretrial incarceration while the false charges were pending.

Source: www.law.northwestern.edu/legalclinic/macarthur/projects/wrongful/livers.html