Category Archives: False Accusation

Kenneth Nixon

Kenneth Nixon was 19 when police say his girlfriend had an affair with his childhood friend, giving him a motive to toss a Molotov cocktail into a Detroit house, killing two children.

However, according to withheld evidence, the State’s key witness ( whose story changed significantly multiple times ) was “obviously coached by family members”.

The case was re-investigated by six undergraduate and graduate students at Northwestern University, with the support of the Medill Justice Project.

For a full description of the case see https://eu.freep.com/story/news/2018/10/27/kenneth-nixon-life-sentence/1739835002/

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Kim Hoover-Moore

In 2002 – five days before Christmas , Columbus police arrested baby-sitter Kim Hoover-Moore for the shaken baby death of 9-month-old Samaisha Benson a month earlier.

She maintained her innocence, but was convicted or murder and other charges.

At trial, in the original autopsy, the coroner determined that the child had no previous brain injuries.

However, when asked by Assistant State Public Defender Joanna Sanchez to re-examine the evidence recently, the same coroner found an old brain injury that the child had suffered – probably about a month before she died – and evidence that the injury re-bled about 4-5 days before she died causing the fatal injuries.

Source: https://www.10tv.com/article/babysitter-convicted-9-month-olds-death-hopeful-new-trial-newfound-evidence

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Alfred Trenkler

On October 28, 1991, a bomb exploded at the Roslindale home of Thomas L. Shay (“Shay Sr.”), killing one Boston police officer and severely injuring another.

The prosecution case was that Alfred Trenkler had built the bomb at the behest Shay Sr.’s son (“Shay Jr.”), who wanted to kill his father in order to cash in on an insurance policy.

In fact, it seems far more likely the bomb was related to Shay Sr.’s legal disputes, Shay Sr.  claimed his previous landlords were making threats on his life.

The case against Shay Jr. (who was convicted in a separate trial) and Trenkler was circumstantial. The government introduced a sales receipt for a toggle switch purchased in October 1991 at a Radio Shack store, however the jury never knew that the switch recovered at the scene was not a Radio Shack switch.

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Antonio Williams, Kendrick Gillum, and Demarco T. Wilson

On February 1, 1997, Charles Newsome was shot in the back and arm while driving in West Memphis, Arkansas, and bled to death. Antonio Williams, Kendrick Gillum, and Demarco T. Wilson (WGW) were subsequently convicted of murder and sentenced to life imprisonment without parole.

The key witness was Frederick Ellis, who was a passenger in the car. In his first statement to police, he could not give the names of the shooters, but then a few hours later he identified Williams and Gillum, then five days later he identified Wilson and another person, who it transpired was in Kentucky at the time. Ellis testified that he had known WGW “pretty much” his entire life.

However Ellis and another witness Kevin Johnson, the only witnesses who identified WGW as the shooters, gave statements which were contradictory and also conflicted with other trial testimony – a defense witness testified the shooters were in another car and not on foot, whereas the State’s witnesses testified the shooters were on foot. In addition, Johnson did not did not give his statement until nine days after the shooting, when he could have talked to Ellis. Ellis and Johnson were both convicted felons, this was the  third Capital Murder trial where Ellis testified that year and after his testimony implicating WGW, the West Memphis Police Department dropped seven charges against him.

In summary the evidence suggests Ellis lied about who shot the victim, and named people in order to curry favour with the police, and perhaps to absolve himself from wrongdoing.

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Robert Pape and Cristin Smith

Robert Pape and Cristin Smith were sentenced to life without parole in the 2006 triple murders of Jon Hayward, his girlfriend, Vicki Friedli, and her 18-year-old daughter, Rebecca “Becky” Friedli, in Pinyon Pines, California.

The victims were found murdered at their Alpine Drive home just north of Highway 74. Hayward and Vicki Friedli died of gunshots to the abdomen and head, respectively. Their bodies were discovered inside their burning home. Becky Friedli’s charred body lay outside in a wheelbarrow and her cause of death was never determined.

Robert was told certain aspects of the crime scene by Javier Garcia, such as the wheelbarrow and the bodies being too burned to identify. Javier testified that he did not know this information until a few days after the murders.

Post-trial discovery has revealed a tape of a Denny’s employee stating that Javier called her the next morning,  stating the facts about the wheelbarrow and the burned bodies.

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Troy Legette

Troy Legette was convicted in 1998 of armed bank robbery.

The prosecution case was entirely speculative/circumstantial. There was no physical evidence to place him at the scene, forensic evidence were tested and didn’t link him to the crime. Also, inconsistent statements documented in police reports from eyewitnesses showed variations from trial testimony.

In addition, the prosecutor told the trial jury that Troy was a non-shedder and this was why DNA found on evidence used in crime didn’t match. The prosecutor made other claims that were either false or unsupported by evidence.

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James Davis

James Davis was found guilty of murder for the shooting death of Blake Harper in 2006. The shooting took place at a crowded party at the Brooklyn Masonic Temple. There was no physical or forensic evidence connecting Davis to the shooting, and the case against him was based solely on a disputed eyewitness testimony.

At his first trial, jurors voted 11-to-1 to acquit Davis, but his then-girlfriend failed to testify at his retrial and he was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to 18-years-to-life in prison.

After a re-investigation, other witnesses have been found who support Davis’ version of events, and prosecution witnesses have retracted or changed their testimony.

More details here

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Michael Shingatok

Michael Shingatok was found guilty of sexual assault, assault and uttering threats in June 2018. An unnamed woman testified that  he was abusive throughout their four-year relationship between 2012 and 2016.

According to a news report, the woman said she reported the crimes because she wanted to get away from Shingatok and get a restraining order. But the defense noted that she stayed in contact with Shingatok despite several moves when she could have left him behind. Moreover, shortly before the woman went to police, she had heard Shingatok was cheating on her. The woman agreed she was angry about that.

Shingatok denied the allegations which were uncorroborated. The woman had a serious issue with alcohol, resulting in a serious house fire and a fall down steps.

In social media discussion, it was alleged that the woman had a record of making false accusations against two other ex-boyfriends.

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Allee Boone

Gerald Green was shot four times and robbed by a man who requested a ride from him.

Green did not identify Boone as his assailant in three photo lineups, and it was not until a fourth lineup that Green identified Boone as the man who shot him.

At trial, Brain Hoover testified that he heard the gunshots and saw a man, not Boone, running away from the area of the shooting.

The jury did not hear from four other witnesses who testified at a post-conviction hearing that another man, of similar appearance to Boone, was likely responsible for the shootings.

In June 1997, the Wisconsin Supreme Court upheld the denial of Boone’s request for a new trial following the post-conviction hearing.

Subsequently the Wisconsin Innocence Project took up the case and filed motions for DNA tests to be performed which could establish Boone’s innocence.

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David Diaz

Martha Sierra accused David Diaz of attempting to kill her boyfriend, Remberto Preciado, in the Lincoln Heights area of L.A., in front of her. According to police, Preciado was asked what neighborhood he was from during a fight over gang rivalries, and subsequently shot in the leg.

At the hospital, Sierra, then 18, was asked for information about the suspect. Detectives showed her photos of registered gang members in Lincoln Heights. She pointed to a young man, skinny with a shaved head, bushy eyebrows, and the start of a moustache. It was David Diaz.

In court, the defense presented evidence that showed Diaz was at the cinema with his family at the time of the shooting. But the jury was swayed by Sierra’s identification of Diaz as the shooter.

Nineteen years later, Sierra admits that she chose Diaz at random due to police pressure. “They told me I couldn’t go home until I identified the criminal. I told them: ‘OK, it’s this guy,’ but I didn’t know who he was,” she told Univision News.

“David Diaz was not the shooter,” said Sierra, now 39. “I feel bad because he should not be there,” she added.

Sierra says the true culprit does not even look like Diaz, but she did not see him among the pictures police showed her. “Everything happened so quickly but I remember that he was tall, with light skin, and skinny.” According to Diaz and his lawyers, the true culprit died in a gunfight.

The victim of the shooting, Remberto Preciado, declared that the accused was not the man who shot him in the leg.

“He is innocent,” Preciado wrote in a letter sent to Univision from Salinas Valley state prison, where he is serving a sentence for an unrelated incident. “In the trial, I testified that David Diaz was not the shooter. He is a victim of injustice of the Los Angeles’ courts,” he wrote.

“Nineteen years of his life have been stolen from him,” he added.

Source: https://www.univision.com/univision-news/united-states/this-man-has-been-imprisoned-for-19-years-but-the-victim-and-a-witness-say-hes-innocent

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Gregory Lance

A Russian couple, Victor and Alla Kolesnikow were murdered in Cookeville, Tennessee on August 5, 1998. Gregory Lance was arrested in April 1999, and subsequently convicted for the crime, based on circumstantial evidence that was either coerced by police or inconclusive.

One witness said that he was let out of jail for giving a statement to police, another contradicted his earlier statement to police.

Following his conviction, Gregory’s family hired a retired FBI Agent to assist them in investigating the case, and a likely alternative suspect was identified.

See this website for details on the case.

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Hector Perez

In 2007, after Hurricane Katrina, Hector being a Skilled Roofer, took a job in Louisiana with a Local Contractor to help Rebuild the Hurricane Ravages. He took his wife, his step -daughter, (whom he ALWAYS cared for like she was his own flesh & blood), and their daughter & moved there.

In Feb 16, 2009, his step-daughter, got mad at him because he told her she could not wear make up to the previous weekend Mardi Gras parade, being she was only 11, he felt that was inappropriate for an 11 year. She threw a BIG fit, threw herself down on the ground & went to school & accused him of “inappropriate” touching. When she arrived at home that day, she went to his bosses house to the bosses wife who sometimes kept the children after school & made the statement “Can I call my friend, I said something I shouldn’t have at school”. It is not known what was said to the friend, although a notebook was found later that she & her friend doodled in that had pictures of men’s privates & things like “men rule, boys drool”. It is suspected that the two girls got together and made a story up because she was mad at Hector.

Hector was charged with aggravated rape, (due to the “victims” age, NO penetration was done), the “victim” was not even taken to a doctor for examination until over 5 months later. Needless to say, there was no physical evidence, and it remains to this day, 8 years later, STILL no physical evidence, just the accusation.

Hector was kept in the Parish, (County) jail. from April 18, 2009 until his “trial”, Dec 20, 2014, well over 5 years! The only reason he was taken to “trial” then, was because in January a new Head DA was to take office after the previous one had to resign after 30 years because of Corruption, (imagine that), the new DA, ironically at one time was assigned to Hector as his Counsel, but was taken off because someone decided he, (Hector), could understand English & didn’t need a Spanish speaking Atty.

After a 5 day “trial”, and it should be noted here that Louisiana is one of only 2 states that the Jury does NOT have to be unanimous, meaning 12 out of 12 does not have to agree, I think it is either 8 or 9 out of 12 for a conviction. During the “trial” a week before Christmas, only 2 defence witnesses were called, even though Hector had others who had personal knowledge about the accusations & the “victim”, they were not called to testify, the States “experts” were called BEFORE the “victim” gave her testimony. one of the Jurors had baby sat the assistant DA trying the case, (she had no business on the jury), also during the “trial”, other people, not having anything to do with the Jury or trial, was seen going in & out of the Jury room. Also note that the “trial” ended the Friday before Christmas. The Jury was in a hurry to get out & go Christmas shopping.

Ultimately, he was found guilty of the Charge & sentenced to Life w/o Parole, (he was NEVER offered a plea deal), which is the sentencing guideline in Louisiana there was nothing the Judge could do to give a lower sentence. What the actual accusation was, is that he “licked the victims butt-crack”, like I said, there was NO penetration, no DNA and how is that to be proved?

Other things to note on this case, he was supposed to be indicted according to Louisiana Law within 120 days, yet he was not until 125 days later, but yet the paperwork had that date crossed out & re dated to reflect indictment at 118 days. Hector did file a Speedy Trial Motion, needless to say nothing was done on that. He also filed a Bond Reduction, that was dismissed due to being “moot, as the individual was not in jail”, yes he was!! He has never been released from jail since his arrest. Also, there are several instances in his file referring to him with the incorrect name.

The defense the Attorney on this case, he was appointed by the Public Defenders office, I guess one would say a “Contract” Attorney. Who did NOTHING!! Just kept continuing the case until the Assistant DA figured they better do something before the NEW Head DA took office in January.

The Attorney was even told that the “victim” had told a family member she did not want to testify, his response was “don’t get in the middle of it”

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Jacob Silva

Jacob Silva was convicted of the murder of Renee Ramos, whose bruised and beaten body was found June 5, 2000, beneath a pile of insulation at the site of a Home Depot under construction in Manteca, San Joaquin County, California.

Jacob Silva and Renee Ramos were boyfriend and girlfriend. Both 18 years old and living pretty much on the streets, sleeping in cars, parks or friend’s homes.

A 14-year-old when questioned by police, said he witnessed the victim’s rape and murder, but subsequently admitted the story was entirely made up. The prosecution case was that this happened five days earlier. There was no evidence to substantiate boy’s original claim, and forensic examiner John Cooper testified that the victim had only been dead for 1 to 3 days, and it was actually closer to one day than three, contradicting the story.

According to prosecutors, there were as many as five people present at the alleged crime.

Nevertheless, despite the complete lack of evidence to support the prosecution case other than the boy’s original story, and the conflict with the time of death according to Cooper, Jacob Silva was convicted of murder, and another man Ty Lopes was convicted of rape and murder.

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George Fleshman

Jurors deliberated for three hours before finding George Fleshman, Jr., guilty of 2nd Degree Murder, stemming from the death of his wife in 2015, according to Jackson Co. Attorney Shawnee Miller.

Fleshman, who had been free on bond, was taken to the Jackson Co. Jail and is scheduled to be sentenced on January 12, 2018, Miller added.

Fleshman’s wife Elizabeth died on October 21, 2015, the day after her husband called 911 and said he found her unresponsive. Mrs. Fleshman was rushed to a Topeka hospital where she later died.

The Jackson Co. Sheriff’s Office said it opened an investigation because of the suspicious circumstances surrounding her death. An autopsy found she died because of a trauma to her spleen.

Source: News Report

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Lee Calvert

50-year old Barry Selby was attacked in the bedroom of his home, in Rayleigh Street, East Bowling, shortly after 2am on Monday, October 14, 2013, while his wife and daughter were present. Five men drove to his home and smashed open the front door . Three of the intruders went upstairs and confronted him.

Mr Selby was shot in the leg and doused from head to foot in sulphuric acid. He suffered 50 per cent acid burns and died in hospital four days later when his vital organs failed.

Lee Calvert, 23, of Stirling Crescent, Holme Wood; Joseph Lowther, 22, of Copgrove Road, Holme Wood; Robert Woodhead, 28, of Fred’s Place, Tyersal; and Andrew Feather, 23, of Heysham Drive, Holme Wood; had all denied murder, but were convicted.

According to Lee’s family, there was no forensic evidence to connect the men to the attack. Four months after the attack, the victim’s wife identified Lee in an identity parade, but she admitted her family had shown her pictures of Lee on facebook. The only other evidence was a drug addict who subsequently admitted he was lying. Two witnesses have come forward to say that the addict had bragged about stitching Lee up. “He was convicted from an identity parade months after the murder. He had to wear a balaclava and he was convicted because someone said they recognised his eyes.” according to Lee’s mother.

News article on conviction July 2104

Solicitor of Lee Calvert says fight to acquit him of murder continues August 2016

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Justin Erskine

Justin Erskine was convicted of first degree murder after being an unwilling witness to murders committed by two other men.

On June 5th 2006, Justin was working for a man named David Hamilton in Dover, Delaware. David was the foreman of the landscaping company Justin was employed with and also a friend. On this day, the weather was bad and both Justin and David took the day off and decided to drive to Baltimore in the company truck. At the time, contained within the truck was a 12-gauge shotgun that David had borrowed from his friend, Matt.

Before leaving for their trip, they visited Matt at his property. Matt asked David if he could obtain some drugs for him, Percocet pills, and David agreed that he would attempt to secure a deal. Matt gave David some money and then both David and Justin left Matt’s home. As they were leaving, David saw two men who he knew could possibly obtain some Percocet pills, the men were Trevor Moncrief and Raymond Ward. Both Trevor and Raymond joined David and Justin in the vehicle and some calls were made by both men to see if the drugs could be obtained.

After a short while driving around, Justin was taken back to Matt’s house by David and Justin remained there until David returned. David explained that the deal he had pursued had been unsuccessful and told Justin and Matt that he thought he had secured a deal via Trevor and Raymond and asked Justin if he would ride with him to make the deal. David felt uncomfortable about going alone and so Justin agreed so as to show support to his friend. All four men, David, Justin, Trevor and Raymond drove to make the deal which turned out to be unsuccessful also.

Eventually, 3 Percocet pills were obtained and the men drove to a gas station. David, Trevor and Raymond went inside while Justin remained in the truck. Shortly after leaving the gas station, David received a call from a friend, Jesus Aviles. David asked the three passengers if they would mind riding with him to a friend’s house and they each agreed.

David vacated the truck alone to speak to Jesus and soon both men returned to the vehicle. David was in the driver’s seat, Jesus by the passenger door and Justin seated in the middle. Directly sat behind David in the back seat was Trevor Moncrief and behind Jesus sat Raymond Ward.

The shotgun was positioned next to David. Jesus asked David if he could see the gun and David obliged and passed over the gun. Justin remained in the middle seat, silent. Once the gun had been passed to Jesus, the men in the back seat knew something wasn’t right and began asking to be let out of the car. Jesus turned around in his seat and began yelling at both men, pointing the shotgun at them; he began shouting at them about money and the fact that they had tried to rob his friend. This continued for around 10-15 minutes. Jesus encouraged the men to plead and told them to pray.

Jesus Aviles then shot Raymond Ward point blank in the head and turned the gun on Trevor Moncrief shooting him in the side of the head. Justin, still sat in the middle, went into shock and couldn’t speak. Jesus began screaming and yelling to be let out of the truck, acting hysterically. David drove Jesus to his mothers, who lived close by.

Before exiting the vehicle, Jesus told both David and Justin,” I know where you live. I know where your family lives. Nobody better say anything about this”.

David immediately called his friend and sister’s boyfriend, Raymond ‘Joey’ Gleaser and told him ,’’I’ve got two I’ve got to get rid of’’ This struck Justin as odd, as though it was a normal practice.

David and Justin drove to David’s sister, Randi’s house and went inside to talk to both her and Joey. Justin was instructed to remain in the vehicle. Justin in complete shock at this point…each movement and conversation felt surreal. Soon, David returned to Justin and the vehicle and took him inside. At this point, David threatened everyone in the room saying ‘If anyone had a problem with what happened he had a loaded shotgun for them too’. As Joey and David held a private discussion, Justin and Randi talked. Randi expressed a deep concern to Justin that she believed the threat that David had made.

Many conversations were held of which Justin held no part over a period of two hours. Soon, David went outside, followed by Justin and Joey. As they stood outside, David heard noises coming from the truck and went to discover that the man who had been sat directly behind him in the vehicle, Trevor Moncrief, was still breathing although in a vegetative state. David issued the instructions that they were all leaving and Justin went to get in the truck with Joey while David returned to his truck where the victims remained. David then came to Joey’s truck to the passenger side, where Justin sat. David told Joey and Justin that Trevor Moncrief was still alive and asked Justin for the butterfly knife he usually carried with him in his bag. David took this knife and returned back to his truck to slit the throat of Trevor Moncrief.

Justin remained in the truck with Joey and didn’t see exactly what happened. Within minutes, David returned back to Justin and Joey and told them that the victim wouldn’t die. Justin responded ‘’Please just hurry up I want to get out of here’’.

Justin just 18 at the time, having witnessed two men brutally murdered just inches away from where he sat, and then receiving threats on his life from both Jesus and David, was desperately trying not to antagonise the situation or David any further.

Joey vacated the vehicle and reached into the bed of the truck into the toolbox he kept there to obtain something, Justin was unaware of what that was, then both Joey and David retuned to the truck with the victims and Justin observed both men reach inside. David told Joey and Justin that they needed to get rid of the bodies and so they drove to Goldsboro, Maryland to some property owned by Joey’s mother. After finding an appropriate location to bury the victims, David dug two holes.

David instructed Justin to help him carry one of the victims to a hole, Justin did this but then refused to help any further. The three men left the property early morning on June 6th, Joey returned home to burn any evidence and David took Justin back to his friend, Matt’s house where Matt gave Justin a ride home. David explained to Matt what had happened and returned his shotgun, telling him to clean the weapon. David returned the truck to the owner of the landscaping company, Bradford Yaeger.

David explained what had happened but said he acted in self- defence after Trevor and Raymond had tried to rob him. David did not mention Jesus Aviles’s involvement and said that Justin had nothing to do with it either.

This story was then repeated in the presence of a neighbour friend of Bradford Yaeger’s who consequently informed the police.

The police arrested David and he admitted to killing both men, he also showed the police where he buried the bodies. David made a statement that said Justin was in no way involved with the death of either man. The police took Justin in for questioning. Justin gave a statement but, like David had, failed to mention Jesus Aviles involvement for fear of his own life and that of his family.

Seven and a half month later, Justin felt compelled to talk to the police again and contacted them himself to go and give them a new statement that told of Jesus Avile’s role in the murders.

A couple of month after this, the police arrested Joey, Matt and Justin.

Justin was arrested and charged with First Degree Murder, Possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony, Conspiracy 1st, Conspiracy 2nd and Tampering with physical evidence on March 21st 2007. Justin was held in custody for 18 months while the case went to trial on September 29th 2008.

The prosecution offered David a plea bargain and used the strategy that Justin had encouraged the murder by ‘giving’ David the butterfly knife that killed Trevor Moncrief, they also used a statement given to the police to say that Justin supported the murders when he had told David to ‘Hurry up because he wanted to get out of there’.

The prosecution used this comment as ‘Instruction to murder’. David took a plea bargain and was charged with Second Degree Murder and sentenced to 15 years.

Justin’s lawyers presented a duress defence. The judge in the trial gave the instruction to the jury of the exceptions for a duress defence, where it would fail, but did not give instructions to exceptions to which accomplice liability could be applied. The judge failed to give the jury a complete and accurate statement of the law under Section 11. Del.C 274 which requires a jury to independently assess the state of mind and culpability for any aggravating circumstances when making a determination as to guilt or innocence of the crime charged. A conviction of accomplice shouldn’t be passed as, the outcome-death of the victim- would have been the same.

The jury actually expressed frustration in its inability to assess Justin’s mental state and although passed a conviction, because of the’letter of the law’ wrote the judge a letter to ask for parole and leniency. The jury felt that a lengthy sentence would be pointless, unjust and inappropriate:

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Jury Letter

The expert witness that testified in Justin’s trial, Dr Mechanick assessed Justin and found that he acted under duress. The prosecutor commented that this witness was ‘bought and paid for’ amongst several other comments that should have been cited a prosecutorial misconduct. Although the judge commented that he had never heard a prosecutor pass a comment about a defence witness being ‘bought and paid for’ he asked only that the jury disregard the comment, making no other instruction for the other improper comments voiced by the prosecution. These comments should not be considered harmless. The doctor’s testimony was central to Justin’s case and his duress defence.

The only evidence used against Justin in this trial was the co-defendant testimony and police interviews. No physical evidence was present that indicated Justin had anything to do with the death of either victim. Both David and Jesus took plea bargains and received reduced sentences and lesser charges despite their involvement and actions being axiomatic in the murders of Trevor Moncrief and Raymond Ward.

Justin was convicted of First Degree Murder under accomplice liability and sentenced to Natural Life without the possibility of parole. He is currently incarcerated at James T Vaughn Correctional Center in Delaware.

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Zach and Dylan Adams

Zach and Dylan Adams were wrongfully charged with the 2011 murder of Holly Bobo. Zach was convicted in September 2017; Dylan is set to go to trial in spring 2018. Cell phone pings prove conclusively that these men did not abduct Holly.

On April 13, 2011, around 7:45am, 20-year-old nursing student Holly Bobo was abducted by a man wearing camouflage outside her Darden, Tennessee home. Her brother, Clint, awoke to the sound of their dogs barking furiously and witnessed the man walking his sister into the woods.

Holly’s cell phone shows her and her abductor driving north about 20 miles, stopping for 20-30 minutes near I-40, then traveling south again using a different route. Her cell phone was disassembled around 9:25am, and the case went cold. In September 2014, Holly’s partial remains were found by ginseng hunters in a wooded area off of I-40. She had been shot in the back of the head.

Investigators initially focused on a local sex offender named Terry Britt, and for good reason: Britt has a history of stalking and rape; many of the women he stalked were blue-eyed blondes like Holly. Britt matched the physical description given by Clint and Clint identified Britt in a voice line-up. While this isn’t conclusive, Britt also couldn’t be excluded as the source of a handprint on Holly’s car. And lastly, Britt not only didn’t have an alibi for that morning, it appears he attempted to fabricate one. He told investigators that he spent the morning with his wife, who stayed home from work to help him install a bathtub. Upon further investigation, it turns out that his wife actually went to work, but Britt called and made her come home and say that she’d been there the whole time. So, Britt was clearly a good suspect, but the case against him never gelled and he was never charged.

In 2014, for reasons that have never been made public, investigators turned their attention to Zach Adams. But instead of questioning Zach directly, they decided to go through his brother Dylan, who is mentally disabled. Dylan was arrested on unrelated weapons charges by the same prosecutor who was working on the Bobo case.

Dylan was threatened with a lengthy prison sentence, but mysteriously given a plea deal where he avoided jail time, but was required to go live with a retired police officer and Bobo family friend named Dennis Benjamin who Dylan had never met. After five weeks of living with Dylan, Benjamin called 911 to report that he had someone who wanted to confess to the murder of Holly Bobo. Dylan was taken in, and indeed he gave a confession. The problem is that when all was said and done, the confession he gave didn’t match any of the physical evidence. Dylan later recanted and claimed that he’d been coerced, but that faulty confession that had no basis in reality formed the basis for Zach’s arrest.

At this point, they went after the men he was with that day: his brother Dylan, and two friends, Shayne Austin and Jason Autry. During the course of questioning, Shayne Austin was offered total immunity if he would agree to flip on Zach. Shayne agreed, but just like Dylan, he was unable to give them anything useful, and he had no idea where the body was. The prosecution withdrew his immunity and spent the next year trying to charge him with murder until he committed suicide.

Jason Autry held out the longest, swearing over and over that he was innocent.

So what was the evidence against these men? Aside from Dylan’s confession, there wasn’t much of anything.

Trial by media

Prosecutors told the media all about Dylan’s confession. They made sure the media knew that Zach threatened his brother that he’d “put him in a hole beside her,” but in terms of actual forensic evidence, there was nothing. And it’s not just that they were hiding the evidence from the public, they were refusing to turn anything over to the defense. The reality of the situation is they were stalling. It’s not that they were hiding evidence, they were hiding the fact that they didn’t have any. And there’s plenty of evidence to support this.

Playing keep-away with the evidence

Every time there was a hearing where the defense was going to complain about the lack of evidence and may have a reasonable chance of the case being dismissed, something would always happen. They would drop the charges and file something else and that hearing would go away and they wouldn’t have to answer any questions about why they weren’t turning over any evidence to the defense.

They did this a few times, but the most notable example of this involved two other men. In the summer of 2014, a woman came forward claiming that her friend Jeff Pearcy showed her a video of Holly Bobo being assaulted. They arrested Jeff and his brother Mark, who allegedly shot the video. They went crazy trying to find the video and any connection between the Pearcy brothers and the other men, but it never materialized.

Mark Pearcy’s preliminary hearing came. Ostensibly, his attorney was planning to ask for the charges to be dismissed against him because at that point, all they had was hearsay. So the prosecution claimed they “forgot” about the hearing and neglected to arrange transfer for him from the jail. The judge rescheduled the hearing, but the day before that hearing, they dropped the charges. But instead of admitting they had no evidence, they made up some story about how they forgot he had federal charges and invoked some law that doesn’t exist where he can’t have federal and state charges against him at the same time. Eventually the state quietly dropped the case against both brothers, but not after ruining both of their reputations.

Their treatment of the main suspects was even worse. In December of 2014, months after the arrests, the defense attorneys were complaining that not only had they not received the evidence, they hadn’t even received a bill of particulars detailing what the men were being accused of doing. The judge ordered them to turn the evidence and the bill of particulars over now. He set a deadline before the end of the year. At this point assistant district attorney Jennifer Nichols withdrew from the case, leaving DA Matt Stowe. Right after the discovery deadline passed, Stowe withdrew from the case and Jennifer Nichols came back on as lead prosecutor. Matt Stowe never was held in contempt over the issue and although Jennifer Nichols was only off the case for a matter of days, she claimed she needed a couple months to “catch up”, a request that was granted and the prosecution was legally allowed to keep stonewalling the defense.

Nothing can be proven, but it is suspicious that there’s this counsel change and it conveniently makes the discovery deadline go away. Following that heated December hearing, there was a meeting between the prosecutors and the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI), who were responsible for analyzing the forensic evidence. Whatever was said during that meeting was so dramatic that it caused the TBI to pull its services from the entire district. An email was later leaked revealing that Stowe accused the TBI of moving “so slowly that the culprits were always one step ahead and that TBI… was leaking information and possibly covering up evidence”.

So it seems pretty clear that in December 2014, there was no evidence aside from Dylan’s confession, which he had recanted by that point. They continued to stall well into 2015. There was a dispute where the defense opposed Jennifer’s appointment as prosecutor, so she claimed she legally had the right to continue withholding evidence until that was settled. It was just getting silly. This continued well into the summer. The defense filed a motion to dismiss the case on the basis of stonewalling by the prosecution. But surprise, surprise: that hearing was, again, cancelled because they dropped the charges and refilled, this time for first degree murder.

Please keep this in mind when you read about the evidence. It’s not like they arrested and charged them on the basis of solid evidence. Very little of what they used to convict Zach even existed at the time of Zach’s arrest. Even a year later when they were all charged with first-degree murder, the case against them was flimsy at best. They arrested these men on the basis of a faulty confession, then used threats and intimidation to build a case against them.

A deal is struck

In early 2017, just a few months before Zach’s scheduled trial, Jason Autry finally agreed to testify for the prosecution as part of a plea deal that has yet to be disclosed publicly. According to Jason Autry, he himself was not involved in the abduction, and this is one detail that we can be relatively certain of: Jason Autry’s cell phone was pinging from a great distance away from both Holly and the other men at the time of the abduction.

On the stand, Autry claimed that he went to Shayne Austin’s home that morning to buy drugs where he saw Holly’s body wrapped in a multi-colored blanket in the back of Zach’s white truck. Zach, Dylan, and Shayne were there, allegedly disposing of evidence from the crime in a burn barrel. According to Autry, Zach later told him that Zach, Dylan, and Shayne went to the Bobo residence that morning to teach Clint how to make meth. Clint was never asked about this at trial, but he later denied this claim and no evidence was ever presented to substantiate any methamphetamine use by Clint or any relationship between him and these men. When they arrived, Holly allegedly came out of the house “screaming and hollering” and at that moment, they decided to abduct her. She was taken to a local barn that was owned by the grandmother of both Shayne Austin and Jason Autry, who were second cousins. (Note: Jason Autry was also a second cousin to Holly Bobo).

The story told by Autry was extremely inflammatory and included incest between the two brothers. After Autry joined the men at Shayne’s house, Shayne and Dylan stayed behind, while Zach and Autry drove off with the body in the back of Zach’s truck. They drove to a spot along the Tennessee River with plans to dump the body in the river, but as they unloaded her body, they realized she was still alive, so Zach shot her in the back of the head. Fearing that the noise of the gunshot may attract attention, they abandoned their plans and loaded the body back into Zach’s truck. Zach dropped Jason off and Jason wasn’t sure where the body went from that point on.

The prosecution presented some other dubious circumstantial evidence against Zach—but the main issue with the case is that it’s simply impossible for them to have committed this murder.

A problematic case

The first issue, which the prosecution tried to gloss over, was that Clint Bobo gave police a very detailed description of the man who kidnapped Holly and none of these men match that witness description. Clint described the perpetrator as being between 5′10″ and 6 feet tall, weighing 180–200 pounds and having dark hair sticking out from under his cap that was long enough to cover his neck and touch his collar. Clint said the man was wearing a hat and camouflage clothing from head to toe. He described the male voice he heard as a “deep, raspy, smoker’s voice.” As mentioned earlier, Clint identified Terry Britt as being a match to the voice he heard that moment. Since that day, Clint has either heard them speak in court or spoken to each of these men personally and has never identified any of them as having the “deep, raspy, smoker’s voice” that he described that morning. His physical description is even more clearly exculpatory. Jason Autry is out of the question. Not only was his phone pinging many miles away at the time, but he’s 6’8” and was nearly 300lbs at the time. Zach Adams has the right hair color, but he is 6’4” and (due to his meth addiction) was a gaunt 145lbs at the time. The height and weight of Dylan at the time is not known, but he was slim, and didn’t weigh anywhere close to 200lbs.

The only one of them who was about the size that Clint described was Shayne Austin. But he didn’t have a deep voice and he certainly didn’t have collar length dark hair; his hair is short and strawberry blonde.

Now of course, the prosecution tried to get around this exculpatory evidence by presenting a storyline that Clint was somehow involved in his sister’s abduction and was therefore an unreliable witness. It’s pretty heartbreaking: Clint lost his sister and despite compelling evidence that he had nothing to do with it, the state threw him under the bus to convict an innocent man.

But the most compelling exculpatory evidence is the cell phone pings. We know that Holly was attacked sometime between 7:42am and 7:46am. At 7:42am, Holly made her last phone call. At 7:46am, her next door neighbor called his mother to report hearing a scream from Holly’s home; his mother relayed the message to Holly’s mother. At 8:17am, we have the first first cell phone ping away from the home tower. Her cell phone moved north until about 8:30am, stopping for 20-30 minutes near the area off of I-40 where her remains were eventually found. At around 9:00am, her cell phone began traveling south again using a different route, passing through the area where Shayne Austin lives. Two papers belonging to Holly were found on the road in front of Shayne’s home, so the killer likely took this road and disposed of evidence on the way. Her cell phone pinged for the last time at 9:25am in the area where her phone was later found. The SIM card had been removed.

When determining who the killer is, we would expect one of three things:

1. Cell phone pings that match Holly’s exactly

2. No cell phone information at all because the cell phone is turned off, or

3. (If they left their phone at home) a cell phone that never leaves their home tower and isn’t being used by anyone during that time frame.

As mentioned earlier, Jason Autry was miles away. There is no cell phone information for Zach at the time when she was abducted, but at 8:19am, Zach was several miles away from Holly. Her cell phone was on the move at this time, so he almost certainly wasn’t in whatever vehicle was being used to kidnap her.

At 8:28am, when the attacker likely stopped his vehicle to rape and kill Holly, Zach’s cell phone was being actively used and was several miles away from Holly’s cell phone. At 9:00am, Holly’s phone moved closer to Zach’s phone, but they’re still not in the same sector. At 9:10am, their phones finally move into the same sector. This is the first overlap that morning.

How is Zach actively using his phone AND kidnapping Holly Bobo if he’s so far away from her during critical time periods? Zach was convicted and sentenced to life in prison in September, 2017. His brother Dylan will be tried for her murder in spring 2018. The details of Jason Autry’s plea deal have yet to be disclosed.

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Victoria Rickman

In the early morning hours of Sept. 13, 2013, Victoria Rickman called 911 to report she had repeatedly shot her boyfriend, Will Carter Jr. She said he raped her. Rickman said she shot to stop the attack.

Defense attorney Amanda Clark Palmer says”She didn’t invite him over. She didn’t want him over there. She didn’t plan to kill him. And she didn’t murder him. I 110-percent believe she shot him in self-defense.”

Source: 48 hours, Nov 11, 2017

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